Fresh Figs & Lemongrass

Delicious fresh figs all plump, sweet, super soft and dripping with nectar. I picked a bunch of fresh figs from my friend Devi’s garden a few days ago. The temptation to eat these figs right off the tree was hard to resist, I ate a couple right away and brought the rest home.

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Fresh figs right off the tree – when fruit is this fresh it’s hard to mess with them by adding them to salads or making a dessert of some sorts. We just ate them in their pure fresh fig form – just delicious😋.  To present these figs as a dessert option that same evening I served a few with aged Parmesan cheese and walnuts. Added a small glass of sweet port and I had the makings of a deliciout fig inspired all-natural dessert.

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I noticed after I picked my fill of fresh figs that Devi had a lush lemongrass bush growing in a corner of her garden. I asked her for a few sprigs and Devi generously cut a few for me.

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My next venture – what to make with the lemongrass? I made lemongrass tea with honey and also made a lemongrass infused butternut squash curry with eggplant, green peppers and broccoli. Served over fluffy white rice, this is a winner of a lemongrass curry.

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Fresh figs are in season now here in California.  Grab them while they are available and enjoy the sweet plump goodness of fresh figs.

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Figs
by D.H. Lawrence

“The proper way to eat a fig, in society,
Is to split it in four, holding it by the stump,
And open it, so that it is a glittering, rosy, moist, honied, heavy-petalled four-petalled flower.

Then you throw away the skin
Which is just like a four-sepalled calyx,
After you have taken off the blossom, with your lips.

But the vulgar way
Is just to put your mouth to the crack, and take out the flesh in one bite.

Every fruit has its secret.

The fig is a very secretive fruit.
As you see it standing growing, you feel at once it is symbolic:
And it seems male.
But when you come to know it better, you agree with the Romans, it is female….”   

 

 

17 thoughts on “Fresh Figs & Lemongrass”

  1. Hi Kalpana, I love the fact that you succumbed to the temptation and enjoyed a couple of figs right off the tree before getting home:) Why wait? I love the spontaneity. A tad mischievous. Adorable!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My friend’s tree usually has hundreds and hundreds of fruit evern in the drought year, but this year it gave only a fraction, of which I was the beneficiary 😊. I wonder if even her tree will eventually give share and not much fruit?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Perhaps I phrased that wrong. I meant that my trees do not make good fruit because they are in the shade. The original trees fruited very well in sunnier and warmer areas in town. I took copies of fourteen different trees to plant on a vacant but shaded parcel in Brookdale. I just put them there to keep them safe (if something happens to the original trees) and to provide cuttings for new copies in sunnier spots. Some cuttings will go to the farm in Scott’s Valley, where it is sufficiently warm.

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          1. Once established, fig trees should not need much water. I found the flavor of my Mission fig was better with ‘medium’ watering. It was good with less water too, but not as productive. If it got too much water, the fruit was big, but not as richly flavored.

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      2. My favorite fig when I lived on Carlton Avenue was a common black fig, like the common ‘Mission’ fig. However, I now have copies of some of the other figs I grew up with, including white figs and a honey fig. The honey fig I remember was from a warm garden in western San Jose, but the original tree did just as well in a cooler garden in Sunnyvale. I also got an old school quince from Sunnyvale as well!

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          1. The Whole Foods on Los Gatos Boulevard? They were my neighbor when I lived in town. That is where my Mission fig is. There are MANY cultivars of figs. I have fourteen, and about seven were cultivars that I grew up with. One good fig tree is probably enough, but I just do not want to lose touch with my old friends.

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